This week the Tykes team received the three beautiful Island Friends books courtesy of We Are Lucky. Having supported the Island Friends project through their successful Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign, our backer's reward finally arrived at Clever Tykes HQ. We're not going to hide the fact that we love...

Code-it Cody is the second book in the Clever Tykes series which follows the story of computer whizz Cody.

What the blurb says

When the Computer Club competition is announced, Cody and his friends must put their coding skills into action. Cody begins a quest to research current computer games before creating the prototype of his very own.

After months of hard work, the moment of truth arrives. Cody and the other Computer Club members have to pitch their prototypes in front of a panel of teachers! Cody’s friend Hana has produced a game that everyone will really like. Can Cody do better?

Walk-it Willow is the first books in the Clever Tykes series and she was the first character to inspire children with her story. Willow loves dogs, especially her big, shaggy dog, Stomp.  Stomp is a real handful but Willow has learnt exactly how to handle him....

What do you think about the concept of teaching entrepreneurship? Most people tend to fall into one of two categories. Some say "you're born with 'it'" and that "you cannot teach 'it'" - 'it' being this kind of entrepreneurial X-factor.  But there are also plenty of people who oppose this view and believe that entrepreneurship can be 'taught'. In fact, I increasingly come across individuals and schemes that claim to be able to 'teach' entrepreneurship. This concept utterly intrigues me. Why? Because we begin to touch on some fundamental issues in our society and how people learn things.

One of the most viewed TED Talks is Sir Ken Robinson's How Schools Kill Creativity. He performed it back in 2006 and it is well worth a watch if you're not one of the 40 million who already have. It is a brilliant piece which...

I'd like to start by drawing your attention to an article I came across on LinkedIn which James Caan posted recently on entrepreneurship. The post outlines some of the barriers facing people who are not "born with the ability to be an entrepreneur" when starting their own business and offers some wise words. I agree that most people prefer a secure job offering a regular salary and that these people struggle to find the confidence to take the leap over to the 'other side'. Taken from top of the article: