The best TED talks on enterprise education

The best TED talks on enterprise education

We’ve compiled a list of the top ten TED and TEDx talks about enterprise education. These ten talks approach the topic of education and inspiring people to be creative, innovative and entrepreneurial in very different ways, but each contributes to the growing awareness and importance of enterprise.

Here we go!

1. Let’s raise kids to be entrepreneurs
Cameron Herold

Bored in school, failing classes, at odds with peers: This child might be an entrepreneur, says Cameron Herold. In his talk, he makes the case for parenting and education that helps would-be entrepreneurs flourish — as kids and as adults.

 

2. How to start a movement
Derek Sivers

With help from some surprising footage, Derek Sivers explains how movements really get started. (Hint: it takes two.)

 

3. How to get your ideas to spread
Seth Godin

In a world of too many options and too little time, our obvious choice is to just ignore the ordinary stuff. Marketing guru Seth Godin spells out why, when it comes to getting our attention, bad or bizarre ideas are more successful than boring ones.

 

4. Teaching one child at a time
Shukla Bose

Educating the poor is more than just a numbers game, says Shukla Bose. She tells the story of her groundbreaking Parikrma Humanity Foundation, which brings hope to India’s slums by looking past the daunting statistics and focusing on treating each child as an individual.

 

5. Let’s use video to reinvent education
Sal Khan

Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects. He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script – give students video lectures to watch at home, and do “homework” in the classroom with the teacher available to help.

 

6. Creating useful people
Jodie Cook

How enterprising skills and role models can prepare future generations for jobs that don’t yet exist.

 

7. What do babies think?
Alison Gopnik

“Babies and young children are like the R&D division of the human species,” says psychologist Alison Gopnik. Her research explores the sophisticated intelligence-gathering and decision-making that babies are really doing when they play.

 

8. Every kid needs a champion
Rita Pierson

Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.'” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.

 

9. What 60 schools can tell us about teaching 21st century skill
Grant Lichtman

The rate of change in the world demands that we re-imagine and restructure the foundational learning relationship among students, teachers, and knowledge. In September 2012, pursuing a decades-long passion for transformational education, Grant packed up his Prius and set off on a solo, nationwide research tour to discover what schools are doing to prepare students for an evolving future. Find out what he learned from three months on the road visiting 21 states, 64 schools, and the great ideas of 500 educators.

 

10. Do schools kill creativity?
Sir Ken Robinson

In one of the most-watched TED talks of all time, Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.

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I am a huge advocate of the entrepreneurial messages and characteristics that you are driving. I think it is a fantastic idea to instil the idea of entrepreneurship into children from a young age. This is a great way to open children up to the idea of not always following conventional paths and giving them the belief and confidence from an early age to pursue their own creative business ideas and ventures. 

James Caan, CBE - entrepreneur and former Dragon
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“The Clever Tykes series are such a wonderful way to introduce ‘enterprise’ to children from a young age – I can’t recommend them highly enough, and strongly urge parents to read along with their child as there is no doubt the stories will stimulate lots of questions and interest!”

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“I found Walk-it Willow easy to read and full of lovely messages that children can take from it. It touched on taking responsibility, problem solving, admitting mistakes and also the work it takes to run a small business. Willow is entertaining but very human. A lovely story.”